FROM LOCAL TRADITION TO INTERNATIONAL CURIOSITY

The Hon is Not a Dying Breed

HonFest is a local tradition. The Bawlmer term of endearment, Hon, short for Honey, embodies the warmth and affection bestowed upon our neighbors and visitors alike by historic working-women of Baltimore. HonFest is an annual celebration in honor of these women.

Since 1994, HonFest has grown from a tiny Baltimore's Best Hon pageant behind Café Hon, to a nationally recognized festival that covers four city blocks on Hampden's very own 36th Street. In recent years, the festival has been acknowledged by The New York Times, Rachel Ray's Tasty Travels, Nightly News with Brian Williams, The New York Post, Southern Living, The LA Times, HGTV, CNN, and just this April by The New Yorker.

The national media coverage isn't "breaking news" around here. Those of us who have witnessed the magnitude of more recent HonFests aren't surprised by national recognition. What has been more surprising to those close to the festival, however, has been the international recognition of late.

A comprehensive analytics program was implemented in conjunction with the launch of the new website, www.honfest.net. Data recovered by this program displays visitors to the site hail from 22 countries! More than half of these countries provided site visitors who stayed to read through more than one page of the site.

In tech-terms, bounce rate is the percentage of website visitors who arrive at a website and leave without going to a second page within the site. Consequently, if you have 100 visitors to your site and 70 of them look at more than one page, you have a 30% bounce rate.

Now that you understand bounce rate, let's look at the interesting details of our international visitors:

The United Kingdom has provided 21 visitors at a 38% bounce rate. Eleven of those visits were from London, three from Manchester and one each from Wallington, Iver and Stourbridge.

Several visitors have also arrived and browsed though the HonFest site from Italy, Romania, Australia, Hong Kong, Spain, China and Canada.

The United States has provided visitors in the thousands from 39 out of our 50 great states.  States with the most visitors are Maryland, DC, Virginia, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, California, Massachusetts, Florida and Texas.

In answer to the question, "Is the hon a dying breed?," Denise Whiting, creator of HonFest, exclaimed, "No! Absolutely not. Hon will live on forever in our hearts, and HonFest gives everyone an opportunity to celebrate and embrace their heritage."

According to those statistics, it doesn't look like "HON" is going anywhere, any time soon. See ya in June, HON!

HonFest: A One-of-a-kind Baltimore Tradition

Think all summer street festivals are about the same? Check out HonFest. Locatecd in the Baltimore neighborhood of Hampden, HonFest celebrates the working women who helped make this great city what it is.

“Hon”, short for Honey, is a classic Bawlmer term of endearment. For generations, it has expressed the warmth and affection bestowed upon neighbors and visitors alike by our mothers and grandmothers.

Since 1994, HonFest has grown from a tiny Baltimore's Best Hon pageant behind Café Hon, to a nationally recognized festival that covers four city blocks on Hampden's very own 36th Street. In recent years, the festival has been acknowledged by The New York Times, Rachel Ray's Tasty Travels, Nightly News with Brian Williams, The New York Post, Southern Living, The LA Times, HGTV, CNN, and The New Yorker.

Each year, revelers from every corner of our city, region, and nation--not to mention from overseas—have come to Hampden to celebrate Baltimore heritage and experience what makes the town like no other.

WHAT IS A HON?

The term Hon is actually a friendly greeting and comes from the word honey. Around here, however, the women who vie to become Baltimore’s Best Hon are a vision of the sixties-era. They are women with beehive hairdos, bright-blue eye shadow, spandex pants and anything with leopard print!

FEEL LIKE YOU WON'T FIT IN?

At HonFest you too can get your own beehive in our Glamour Lounge, listen to talented local musicians, and check out the work of local artists, while you stroll down The Avenue.

HOW CAN I FIND IT!?

This nationally recognized festival covers four city blocks on 36th Street (The Avenue) in the neighborhood of Hampden. Hampden is a revered old-style Baltimore neighborhood, filled with quirky shops, quaint restaurants and endearing residents. HonFest gives local storeowners the opportunity to spill-out onto the sidewalk and showcase their wares. HonFest is a favorite destination for young and old, tourist and resident.

Check out our schedule and direction page for directions to Honfest!

Honfest 2008 On "The Avenue"

Produced in 2008 by Lewkovision.